Thursday, December 31, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


To close out 2009 here is a closeup of Mexican Hat.

I hope everyone has had an enjoyable 2009. Happy New Year! Stay safe tonight and watch for the Blue Moon.

Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


After passing the eroded mesas of Monument Valley, highway US 163 crosses 20 miles of rather flat landscape past scattered Navajo houses to Mexican Hat, a small settlement named after a curious formation nearby consisting of a large flat rock 60 feet in diameter perched precariously on a much smaller base at the top of a small hill. The rock formation resembles an overturned sombrero.

Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Here is one more section of Newspaper Rock before I move on up the road.

Monday, December 28, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


You saw Santa and his Reindeer before Christmas, now here is the entire Newspaper Rock. There is no know methods of dating rock art. In interpreting the figures on the rock, scholars are undecided as to their meaning or have yet to decipher them. In Navajo, the rock is called "Tse 'Hane'" (rock that tells a story). Unfortunately, we do not know if the figures represent story telling, doodling, hunting magic, clan symbols, ancient graffiti or something else. Without a true understanding of the petroglyphs, much is left for individual admiration and interpretation.

Friday, December 25, 2009

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Here is a small portion of Newspaper Rock which is a petroglyph panel etched in sandstone that records approximately 2000 years of early man's activities. Prehistoric peoples, probably from the Archaic, Basketmaker, Fremont and Pueblo cultures, etched on the rock from B.C. time to A.D. 1300. In historic times, Utah and Navajo tribesmen, as well as Anglos, left their contributions. This small portion reminded be of Santa Claus pulling his reindeer across the sky on his journey tonight. Merry Christmas Eve!

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


The Goosenecks truly are a wonder to behold. You can look into a 1,000-foot-deep chasm carved through the Pennsylvanian Hermosa Formation by the silt-laden San Juan River. The river meanders back and forth, flowing for more than five miles while progressing only one linear mile toward the Colorado River and Lake Powell. It looked like Ribbon Candy, only bigger.

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Come on Ken, you can get a little closer to the edge!

Monday, December 21, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Experience life on the edge! The spectacular view you see represents over 300 million years of geologic history. You are (pretend) standing on the edge of the Goosenecks of the San Juan, one of the most striking examples of an entrenched river meander in North America. Take a moment to experience the solitude, feel the vastness of open space, and enjoy the pristine beauty of this special place.

Friday, December 18, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Next to the San Juan Inn is this little gorge and the San Juan River. See where the river ends up next week.

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Here is a montage of a few signs at the San Juan Inn & trading Post.

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


We stopped at the rustic and authentic San Juan Inn & Trading Post which dates to the oil boom days, and offers lodging, dining, and a bar and grill in the style of a southern Utah outpost. Here is their restaurant window.

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Here is one last panorama view of the East and West Mittens and Merrick buttes before I leave Monument Valley and head down the road.

Monday, December 14, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Monument Valley is not a valley in the conventional sense, but rather a wide flat, sometimes desolate landscape, interrupted by the crumbling formations rising hundreds of feet into the air, the last remnants of the sandstone layers that once covered the entire region. Although the Navajo did not actually build totem poles, one the most famous features is the "Totem Pole", an oft-photographed spire of rock 450 feet high but only a few meters wide. Here is my image of it with the sand dune in the foreground.

Friday, December 11, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


This rock outcrop reminded me of an alien from a Sci Fi movie.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Moccasin Arch is a large pothole natural arch eroded in DeChelly sandstone. It is one of several nice arches in Monument Valley. Here are some members of the group trying to stay out of the way (without success) of my ultra wide lens.

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Here is another image of "Big Hogan" with our Navajo guide Tom looking up at the opening.

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


There are many named features in Monument Valley. This cave natural arch eroded in DeChelly sandstone is called "Big Hogan". If you zoom in on its opening I thought it looked like a spider.

Monday, December 7, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


We came across these horses looking for a morning drink.

Friday, December 4, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


As the sun started to light up the valley it brought a wonderful glow to the red soil.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


The next morning our group took a guided Navajo tour of Monument Valley. That meant getting up at Oh-Dark Hundred and bouncing along the dirt road into the vast hidden parts of the valley to get set up for a sunrise shot. No fake full moon added to my pictures. Good Morning Monument Valley!

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Here is another view of Monument Valley framed by Ansel's Rocks.

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Southwest Trip 2009


Monument Valley is a region of the Colorado Plateau characterized by a cluster of vast and iconic sandstone buttes, the largest reaching 1,000 ft (300 m) above the valley floor. It is located on the southern border of Utah with northern Arizona, near the Four Corners area. The valley lies within the range of the Navajo Nation Reservation. The Navajo name for the valley is Tsé Bii' Ndzisgaii (Valley of the Rocks). The floor is largely Cutler Red siltstone or its sand deposited by the meandering rivers that carved the valley. The valley's vivid red color comes from iron oxide exposed in the weathered siltstone. The darker, blue-gray rocks in the valley get their color from manganese oxide.
The buttes are clearly stratified, with three principal layers. The lowest layer is Organ Rock shale, the middle de Chelly sandstone and the top layer is Moenkopi shale capped by Shinarump siltstone. The valley includes large stone structures including the famed Eye of the Sun. Monument Valley has been featured in many forms of media since the 1930s. Appearances include films, such as Westerns by director John Ford

It was late in the afternoon and the lighting was still flat and overcast but with a few color balance adjustments and filters I was able to take this Iconic shot of the Valley with Ansel Adam's Rocks in the foreground.