Friday, July 30, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Burls weaken trees and this Spruce fell down giving a different view of the Burls on the ground.

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Today I am starting to show some images of Spruce Burls. The rounded knobs are tumors. Damage to a tip or bud of the Sitka spruce caused growth cells to divide more rapidly than normal to form these swellings or burls. Chemically the same as normal wood, a burl is technically a cancer. The nearby ocean seems to be a factor. Possibly an attacking bud worm triggered the change, perhaps by carrying a virus or an inorganic compound from the salt spray into the tree.

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


This is the famous Artist's Conk Ganoderma applanatum. The white pore surface bruises easily, and a detailed drawing can be etched into the surface that on drying will remain permanently. They can grow to be 20 inches across and these were the largest one's that I saw.

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


It is way above my pay grade to identify this fungi but my guess is this is Witch's butter (Tremella mesenterica), a jelly fungus. Jelly fungi are the reproductive organs of orders Auriculariales, Dacrymycetales and Tremellales from Basidiomycota group.
Addendum - I now feel these are Yellow Fairy Cups Bisporella citrina.

Monday, July 26, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Here is a group of mushrooms growing out of a fallen tree.

Friday, July 23, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Bracket fungi, or shelf fungi, among many groups of the fungi in the phylum Basidiomycota. Characteristically, they produce shelf- or bracket-shaped fruiting bodies called conks that lie in a close planar grouping of separate or interconnected horizontal rows. Brackets can range from only a single row of a few caps, to dozens of rows of caps that can weigh several hundred pounds and are mainly found on trees, and resemble mushrooms. Some form annual fruiting bodies while others are perennial and grow larger year after year. Bracket fungi are typically tough and sturdy and produce their spores, called basidiospores, within the pores that typically make up the undersurface. Another common name is "Bears bread". The bears do not actually eat these things, they usually are really hard and feel like wood. What I liked about this conk is that the top of it is covered in moss.

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Time to explore some images from the Kingdom of Fungi - Mushrooms. Not identified just enjoy.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Here is one last look at James Pond. I was there in May (before bug season). If you went now it would be loaded with mosquitoes and other nasty bugs.

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


It is often difficult to take a picture showing a large area so you might want to isolated a small area as I have done here showcasing some grass that is growing up through the water of James Pond.

Monday, July 19, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


This week I will share some images of James Pond which is near the Mora Campground. A short half mile trail took us to this spot. Anybody want to walk out on this log? Not me.

Friday, July 16, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Here is a sequence of three shots of this gull standing of a rock outcropping watching this wave come at him. Just as it crashes on him he flies up through the spray.

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Limpet is a common name for numerous different kinds of saltwater and freshwater snails (aquatic gastropod mollusks) that have a simple shell which is basically conical in shape. They are found in cooler waters of the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean. Limpets cling tightly to a rock (using the muscular foot). During the day, limpets move around by rippling the muscles of the foot in a wave-like fashion, looking for food. They return to the same place on their rock each night as seen in this image. No one knows exactly how they find their way back to the same spot each time.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


The Giant Green Anemone as it looks fully open under water.

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


Sometimes you need to look at the most common things to find an interesting image. Here are the effects on the beach sand as the waves pull out and create these ripple patterns.

Monday, July 12, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


I found this rock on "Third Beach" and thought it looked interesting. Imagine the story behind its creation.

Friday, July 9, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


The Giant Green Anemone Anthopleura xanthogrammicais is one of the most spectacular anemones. They can be quite large and very green. They look somewhat like a plant or flower, but they are actually animals. This beautiful sea anemone has a special symbiotic relationship with an algae living in its tissues. This algae, called zooxanthellae, provides nourishment for the anemone with proper lighting. Under strong sunlight the algae is encouraged to grow and the sea anemone gets very green as seen in this image.

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


The Ochre Sea Stars come in different colors. Here are two of them showing off their contrasting colors.

Wednesday, July 7, 2010

Olympic Peninsula 2010


When I grew up we referred to these as starfish. Now Marine scientists have undertaken the difficult task of replacing the beloved starfish’s common name with sea star because, well, the starfish is not a fish. It’s an echinoderm, closely related to sea urchins and sand dollars. Here we have a fine example of an Ochre Sea Star Pisaster ochraceus.

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Friday, July 2, 2010

Thursday, July 1, 2010