Friday, October 29, 2010

Verde Canyon


When we reached Perkinsville they switch the engines to the other end of the train and take us back to Clarkdale. There is not much left of Perkinsville but here is the old train depot. They would not let us off the train to explore (bummer). Next week the trip back.

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Verde Canyon


As we traveled deeper into the canyon these nice clouds developed.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Verde Canyon


Ocotillo cactus (Fouquieria splendens Engelm.) is a curious and unique desert plant found throughout the southwest. Common names include ocotillo, desert coral, coachwhip, Jacob's staff, and vine cactus, although it is not a true cactus. Here is a nice looking group of them shot from the train.

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Verde Canyon


It's not the destination it's the journey! The historic route is nestled between two national forests and adjacent to a designated wilderness area. This unique geological wonderland features rugged, high desert rock faces and spectacular panoramic views. This distinctive confluence of desert and wetland is populated by a variety of wildlife, which thrives among the indigenous trees, shrubs, cactus's and wildflowers. Here is a view of the Verde River from the train.

Monday, October 25, 2010

Verde Canyon


The main reason for this trip to Arizona was to take the Verde Canyon Railroad thru the Verde Canyon. Running from Clarkdale to Perkinsville, the Verde Canyon Railroad is a stress-free wilderness adventure…at 12 mph. As the gentle iron giants wind their way through one of Arizona’s treasures, being onboard makes your senses come alive. You hear the wheels echo off the canyon walls, feel the gentle wind kiss your cheek, taste Arizona’s special blend of fresh air. But the sense most energized is that of adventure…railroad style. The train passes towering crimson pinnacles; near ancient Indian ruins; over fortified trestles; past a monocline fault and through a manmade 680-foot tunnel on a four-hour rail journey from the old mining town of Clarkdale to the Perkinsville ghost ranch and back. This is the only way to travel thru this canyon as there are no roads.

Two FP7 locomotives pull 18 passenger cars through the Verde Canyon to Perkinsville and back. The engines, built in 1953 by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors, first debuted on the Alaska Railroad for their centennial celebration. Mountain Diesel, a Colorado-based company, purchased the engines and exhibited them at a California museum before their purchase by the Wyoming/Colorado Railroad in Laramie, Wyoming. In November 1996, the engines were moved to Clarkdale, Arizona. After three months of restoration the classic iron horses were decorated with the Bald Eagle as a tribute to the inhabitants of the Verde Canyon and our American heritage, taking on the symbol of the Verde Canyon Railroad with their exclusive paint scheme. The engines made their maiden journey on Arizona rails on March 8, 1997. Today's image is of one of these majestic engines.

Friday, October 22, 2010

Seligman Arizona


If your car broke down you fixed it. I think that's what this couple is doing!

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Seligman Arizona


Here is a mural showing the path of Route 66 from Chicago to Santa Monica and the location of Seligman Arizona.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Seligman Arizona


All the comforts of outdoor plumbing can be found in Seligman!

Monday, October 18, 2010

Seligman Arizona


Today I am starting to show my images of signs and fun images of Seligman, Arizona. Seligman, Arizona is a Route 66 town all the way. This delightful town retains all the flavor of the old road. A trip down Route 66 in Seligman is a trip back in time to the days when Route 66 was the Main Street of America. Founded in 1895 after the completion of the "Peavine" Railroad. The railroad camp known as Prescott Junction officially became Seligman and was an important railroad stop along the line. Seligman embraced Route 66 wholeheartedly upon its arrival in the late 1920’s. The railroad and tourist traffic from Route 66 became Seligman's main source of economic security. In the late 1970's Seligman was bypassed by the Interstate and the Santa Fe Railroad ceased its operations in the town in 1985. Many old towns with similar histories would have faded away once they were bypassed, but not Seligman. As you drive down Route 66, evidence of the glory days of the old road could be seen all along the main street. Motels such as the Aztec across the street from the famous Snow Cap, with its quirky tongue and cheek menu, cafes such as the Copper Cart, and numerous Route 66 gift shops were all survivors of the Mother Road. To me, Seligman seemed to preserve the best of the fun days of Route 66. You have to get out of your car and explore Seligman on foot. What's on the menu today? No moon last night so we have a full menu today. Would you like a cup of coffee to go with your chef's surprise? “You Kill It, We Grill It." Splatter Platter - Swirl of Squirrel - Big Bagged Stag - Highway Hash. So many choices! Today's image is (you guessed it) - The world famous, Road Kill 66 Cafe!

Friday, October 15, 2010

Road Signs


Yes, I am back from my latest adventure, but before I can tell you about and show you those images I need to continue with the previous trip to Arizona and Sedona. Here is a continuation of road signs that I shot. This one was taken in Sedona and it made me smile.

Friday, October 1, 2010

Road Signs


This funny sign was found on an old gas pump in Seligman, Arizona. Yes I have more, but the road is calling me again. I am off to shoot Lions (no), Tigers (no) Bears (yes) and much more. When I get back I will continue this series of road signs.