Thursday, June 30, 2011

Central Oregon Coast


You have now seen the new lighthouses that I visited. I will now show some artistic views of them. Here is a closeup of the top of Yaquina Head Lighthouse. It's all about curves.

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Central Oregon Coast


Yaquina Head Lighthouse is one of the most popular lighthouses in the United States. There are hundreds of thousands of guests that visit every year. The tower is the tallest on the Oregon Coast - soaring 93 feet in the air. This lighthouse is the only Oregon Lighthouse with a marble floor. It stands 162 feet above sea level, and can be seen from ocean vessels as far away as 19 miles. I was told this by one of the volunteers at this lighthouse. She added that it can be seen "no further, thanks to the curvature of the earth." During construction, two different boats met their doom on Yaquina Head's shores trying to deliver supplies. After much labor, the lighthouse was lit on August 20, 1873. There was a large dwelling built for the three keepers that manned this lighthouse station. Because of this lighthouses proximity on the coast, there were a number of storms and high winds that caused surface damage to the tower and the keeper's dwellings. Fences were built to ward off rocks and other debris from destroying the property. However, this didn't stop the tower from being struck by lightning in October of 1920. Luckily, through the years, the lightening and severe storms haven't really hurt this lighthouse. In fact, to this very day the structure of the lighthouse is within one inch of being perfectly straight. I hiked up to the top of the mountain overlooking the lighthouse to shoot this image.

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Central Oregon Coast


The Yaquina Bay Lighthouse is another popular lighthouse to visit along the Oregon coast. You wouldn't imagine this lighthouse was only in operation for three years, and was nearly torn down several times. Nonetheless, it stood the test of time and now offers a terrific place for visitors to take a brief look into the past. A number of people had wonderful expectations for Yaquina Bay and the Newport area. As a result, this lighthouse was built to begin the expected migration of settlers into this fertile land. The lighthouse was lit for the first time on November 3, 1871. Both before and after the completion of the Yaquina Bay Lighthouse people argued over where the lighthouse should have been built. As a result, the Yaquina Head Lighthouse was built just two years later. Then, just one year after that, on October 1, 1874, Yaquina Bay's light was extinguished. It is believed to be the oldest structure in Newport. It is also the only existing Oregon lighthouse with the living quarters attached, and the only historic wooden Oregon lighthouse still standing.

Monday, June 27, 2011

Central Oregon Coast


What do former lighthouse keepers do when they retire? They do what Jim Gibbs (a former keeper of Tillamook Rock Lighthouse) did. He built Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse. The tower is a replica of the 1898 Fiddle Reef Lighthouse, which was a lighthouse on Vancouver Island long ago. Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse stands 110 feet above the Pacific Ocean. Gibbs decided to build this private lighthouse as part of his home. It is located on the cliffs just south of Yachats. This lighthouse is not open to the public, and can only be viewed from mile post 166 on Oregon's Highway 101. Just after passing this mile post marker, look down off the northwest side of the highway, and you will see James Gibb's home and lighthouse as shown above.

Friday, June 24, 2011

Central Oregon Coast


Named after the Spanish Explorer Don Bruno de Heceta, the Heceta Head Lighthouse towers 205 feet above the Pacific Ocean. This lighthouse is one of my favorites because of the amazing view of the ocean. This site was purchased in 1889, and five years later on March 30, 1894, the light was lit by Andrew Hald, Heceta Head's first principal keeper. Unlike a number of the other lighthouses on the Oregon coast, Heceta Head Lighthouse doesn't offer stories of life and death. Several families had the opportunity to call Heceta Head their home. The children all attended school together in a single-room, as travel around Heceta Head was somewhat minimal due to its remote location. However, this all changed soon after the highway was completed between Florence and Yachats in 1932. Nearby, there is a bridge over Cape Creek and a tunnel that makes its way through the hillside. A couple years later, electricity finally arrived at the lighthouse and the lamp was replaced with a bulb.

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Central Oregon Coast


The Umpqua River Lighthouse became the first lighthouse on the Oregon Coast and was lit on October 10, 1857 when Keeper Fayette Crosby lit the third-order Fresnel lens. The lighthouse was similar to others built at the time, a large Cape Cod duplex with a tower rising from the gabled roof, 92 feet above ground. Unfortunately, the survey crew never saw the site at flood stage, or the location may have been different. Winter storms brought swollen river banks and crashing seas. The lighthouse, built on sand, was constantly battered. A coastal gale, on February 8, 1861, along with a record mountain run off, combined to blast away at the foundation. The foundation was eroded and the house and tower tilted slightly. Another violent storm in October 1863 added even more to the damage. The keepers lived in fear that the entire structure would collapse along with them in it. They petitioned for the structure to be abandoned, and in late January 1864, they were given the go ahead. A week later, the lighting apparatus was removed, and while crews were in the process of dismantling the iron lantern house, the tower began to shake and sway. The men dropped their work and ran for their lives, and none too soon. Only minutes later, the tower came crashing down.
In 1888, $50,000 was appropriated for the construction of the second Umpqua River lighthouse. This time, with lesson learned, it was built further inland on a headland above the mouth of the river. The site is the furthest away from a river or ocean of all the lighthouses along the Oregon coast. Construction lasted from 1891 to 1894. The new lighthouse, a sibling to Heceta Head, is a 65-foot tower which stands 165 feet above sea level. The tower, brick overlaid with cement plaster, is five feet thick at the base and tapers to 21 inches thick at the parapet.
Today the Fresnel light is still shining.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Central Oregon Coast


There are eleven lighthouses standing strong along the Oregon coast. Many of these have been restored, and offer a look back into Oregon's past. On this latest trip to the Central Oregon Coast I was able to shoot six of them. The Cape Arago Lighthouse standing today is the third lighthouse at this location. It's tower is 44 feet high, and was illuminated in 1934.

Monday, June 20, 2011

Central Oregon Coast


Yachats , pronounced YAH-hots, is derived from the Chinook Indian word, Yahuts, meaning dark waters at the foot of the mountain. Nestled between the lush forested mountains of the Coast Range and the lapping waves of the Pacific surf, the charming village of Yachats opens a window to the environment. It is the ideal place for discovery and renewal, rest, recreation and romance. For two weeks this village was our home as we explored, hiked and photographed the Central Oregon Coast. We rented a house up on a hill overlooking the village and the Pacific Ocean. This was our view.

Friday, June 17, 2011

Salt Lake City


As the sun sets and the moon rises on Salt Lake City from my hotel room this will conclude my images of this wonderful trip to the Tetons, Yellowstone, Salt Lake City and the back-roads between them. Next week I will start a new series of images.

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Salt Lake City


Here is a night view of the temple shot from a neighboring building.

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Salt Lake City


Here is another angle to the view of the Temple.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Salt Lake City


While not as large as the Temple, the Gothic-style Assembly Hall is still a very charming Gothic-style building with beautiful stained-glass windows. This jewel of a building was constructed between 1877 and 1882.

Monday, June 13, 2011

Salt Lake City


Positioned on Salt Lake City's center block, known as Temple Square, the spires of the Salt Lake Temple rise amid downtown high-rises and super malls. The Salt Lake Temple took 40 years to build. The Exterior Finish is Quartz monzonite (similar to granite) quarried from Little Cottonwood Canyon 20 miles southeast of Salt Lake City. The Six-spire design is suggestive of Gothic and other classical styles but unique, distinctive, and symbolic. All in all, very photogenic.

Friday, June 10, 2011

Salt Lake City



I love to photograph flowing water, even in a fountain.

Thursday, June 9, 2011

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Salt Lake City


The old train station is no longer used but the signage still looks good.

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Salt Lake City


Now, how about this for a light fixture?

Monday, June 6, 2011

Salt Lake City


I shot these images of the interior of the Capital on a Sunday. I was expecting the building to be locked up but it was wide open, no guards and no people. Amazing! Here is the Grand Staircase leading up to the Supreme Court.

Friday, June 3, 2011

Salt Lake City


The inside of the Capital Building was like a museum. There was art, murals and marble everywhere. Here is a view of the rotunda shooting straight up.

Thursday, June 2, 2011

Salt Lake City


The capital also looked cool at night. What I liked about this image is the way one flag is blowing East and the other is blowing West.

Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Salt Lake City


Here is another picture of the capital with a stone memorial in the foreground to add an interesting perspective. Which is bigger?